Switch on/off + Remove – Journey to the Oracle Cloud – II

What happened so far on my Journey to the Cloud?

DBaaS Oracle Cloud

Day 2 of my Cloud exploration journey.

In my blog posts about my DBaaS Cloud journey I won’t explain a lot about how to login to the Oracle Cloud or how to setup a simple database as others have done this already including the SSH key topic:

But let me show you some findings I’ve had when logging in via SSH to my DBaaS environment. In the following article I will describe how to:

  • Switch off Flashback Database
  • Clean up expired Backups and Archivelogs
  • Clean up traces and set the retention policy
  • Remove APEX from the CDB$ROOT

Flashback Database is ON by default

After playing around with my DBaaS environment for a few days all got stuck. The database hung. A quick look into the alert.log revealed the simple reason: my database had no space anymore on the Flash Recovery Area mount point. “Why that?” I did ask myself.

Well,

SQL> select FLASHBACK_ON from V$DATABASE;
YES

told me the answer. By default FLASHBACK DATABASE is ON. Great idea but for playground-mode you may or may not switch it OFF. Furthermore in my (developers) environment the logs will be written to /u03/app/oracle/flash_recovery_area/flashback (DB_RECOVERY_FILE_DEST) – and DB_RECOVERY_FILE_DEST_SIZE is defined at only 7.5GB. That got consumed quickly.

You may switch it OFF if you don’t need FLASHBACK DATABASE at the moment. Or check at least increase the DB_RECOVERY_FILE_DEST_SIZE.

SQL> alter database flashback off;
SQL> exit
$  rm /u03/app/oracle/flash_recovery_area/flashback/*

And just for the records:
You don’t need to have FLASHBACK DATABASE switched ON as a feature in order to use GUARANTEED RESTORE points (which is one of the best things – I used it almost daily before I “destroy” something in my databases).

Quick check:

SQL> select FLASHBACK_ON from V$DATABASE;
NO

SQL> create restore point DESTROY_ME guarantee flashback database;

If you’d check now:

SQL> select flashback_on from v$database;

FLASHBACK_ON
------------------
RESTORE POINT ONLY

Don’t forget to drop your GUARANTEED RESTORE POINT later on.

SQL> drop restore point DESTROY_ME;

Clean up your expired BACKUPS and ARCHIVE LOGS 

Every database should be run in archivelog mode – no doubt. But if you are short on disk space for the archive logs you may need to clean up from time to time. Furthermore archivelog mode is necessary in order to support certain actions in Oracle Multitenant.

Keep in mind:
Backups and Archivelogs don’t clean up themselves.

Clean up expired backups:

$ rman target /
RMAN> crosscheck backup;
RMAN> delete noprompt obsolete;
RMAN> delete expired backup;

Clean up archivelogs:

$ rman target /
RMAN> crosscheck archivelog all;
RMAN> delete noprompt expired archivelog all;

Clean up Trace and Log Files and set the Retention

The default retention for traces has been set to standard values in the cloud as well. You may change this to get a more frequent purging of traces. The interface to tweak settings is ADRCI. Find a nice ADRCI Survival Guide for DBAs here written by my colleague Uwe Hesse,

adrci> show control

To solve DIA-48448 you’ll have to set the correct diag directory you want to look at:

adrci> show homes
ADR Homes:
diag/rdbms/mike/MIKE
diag/tnslsnr/slc01qnv/listener
diag/tnslsnr/MIKEVM/listener

adrci> set home diag/rdbms/mike/MIKE

adrci> show control

ADR Home = /u01/app/oracle/diag/rdbms/mike/MIKE:
*************************************************************************
ADRID                SHORTP_POLICY        LONGP_POLICY         LAST_MOD_TIME                            LAST_AUTOPRG_TIME                        LAST_MANUPRG_TIME                        ADRDIR_VERSION       ADRSCHM_VERSION      ADRSCHMV_SUMMARY     ADRALERT_VERSION     CREATE_TIME
-------------------- -------------------- -------------------- ---------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------- -------------------- -------------------- -------------------- -------------------- ----------------------------------------
4162796853           720                  8760 2015-09-17 13:51:04.699486 +00:00        2015-11-30 17:53:33.062134 +00:00                                                 1                    2                    82                   1                    2015-09-17 13:51:04.699486 +00:00
1 rows fetched

This means SHORTP_POLICY and LONGP_POLICY are set to 30 days and 365 days (~1 year).

I’d usually change it (that is pretty up to your personal preferences) and purge whatever is older than a few days for a start.

adrci> set control (SHORTP_POLICY=96, LONGP_POLICY=720)

switching the short term policy to 4 days, the long term policy (alert.log, incidents) to 30 days. And finally cleaning up also older traces for a fresh start:

adrci> purge -age 24

This tool a while (~ 10 minutes) in my environment.

Remove Oracle Application Express (APEX) from the CDB$ROOT

As I wrote a few weeks ago Oracle APEX is a fantastic – and unfortunately still the most undervalued – Oracle tool. The only real treatment you should do to your Cloud database first is removing APEX from the CDB$ROOT before either plugging something in or creating pluggable database. If you have created pluggable databases (PDBs) already please make sure that APEX is not used in any of them as removing APEX from the CDB$ROOT will remove it from all existing PDBs as well.

See: https://blogs.oracle.com/UPGRADE/entry/apex_in_pdb_does_not 
on Why and How to remove Oracle APEX from the CDB$ROOT.

In short:

  1. Make sure to change into the local $ORACLE_HOME/apex directory first before starting SQL*Plus:
    cd $ORACLE_HOME/apex
  2. Connect to your CDB$ROOT:
    sqlplus / as sysdba
  3. Run the “Remove APEX from the CDB$ROOT” script:
    SQL> @apxremov_con.sql
  4. Recompile to get rid of any invalid objects left over by the removal script:
    SQL> @?/rdbms/admin/utlrp.sql

That sounds simple, doesn’t it?

Well, but my journey ends here for today as I’m getting 28 invalid objects (which don’t compile) afterwards – and plenty of nice ORA-600 errors in the alert.log looking fantastically similar to Data Dictionary corruptions. I think my Part 3 of the journey will be a patching cycle.

ORA-00600: internal error code, arguments: [ktsircinfo_num1],
[1], [4], [71210]
ORA-00600: internal error code, arguments: [6711], [4228381],
[1], [4228380], [3]

A look into the list of INVALID objects give me this result – from the Cloud documentation I see that C##PDBMGR is a self-provisioning user env:

The Oracle Pluggable Database Self-Service Provisioning application provides an interface to Oracle Database 12c Multitenant option and allows for the provisioning of Pluggable Databases (PDBs). You can perform PDB operations including create, clone, open/close, plug/unplug, and drop. Additionally, you can grant others access to the application, giving them rights to create and manage their own PDBs within the quota limits you set.

So maybe it is not a good idea to remove APEX from the CDB$ROOT in our Oracle DBaaS Cloud environment? I will find out next week …

SQL> column object_type heading "Type" Format a15
SQL> column object_name heading "Name" format a30
SQL> column owner heading "Owner" format a20
SQL> set pagesize 100
SQL> select owner, object_type, object_name from dba_objects where status='INVALID';

Owner                Type            Name
-------------------- --------------- ------------------------------
SYS                  PACKAGE BODY    WWV_DBMS_SQL
FLOWS_FILES          TRIGGER         WWV_BIU_FLOW_FILE_OBJECTS
APEX_040200          TRIGGER         APEX$_WS_ROWS_T1
C##DBAAS_MONITOR     FUNCTION        DBM_IS_CDB
C##PDBMGR            PACKAGE BODY    PDBSS_PDB_MGR
C##PDBMGR            TRIGGER         PDBSS_APPLICATION_LOG_BI
C##PDBMGR            TRIGGER         PDBSS_ERROR_LOG_BI
C##PDBMGR            TRIGGER         PDBSS_PREFERENCES_BIU
C##PDBMGR            TRIGGER         PDBSS_RESERVED_DB_NAMES_BIU
C##PDBMGR            TRIGGER         PDBSS_DB_SIZES_BIU
C##PDBMGR            TRIGGER         PDBSS_RESOURCE_PLANS_BIU
C##PDBMGR            TRIGGER         PDBSS_USERS_BIU
C##PDBMGR            TRIGGER         PDBSS_USER_LOG_BI
C##PDBMGR            TRIGGER         PDBSS_ACCESS_REQUESTS_BIU
C##PDBMGR            TRIGGER         PDBSS_DATABASES_BIU
C##PDBMGR            TRIGGER         PDBSS_DATABASE_LOG_BI
C##PDBMGR            TRIGGER         PDBSS_DATABASE_ADMINS_BIU
C##PDBMGR            TRIGGER         BIU_PDBSS_EMAIL_TEMP_TYPES
C##PDBMGR            TRIGGER         BIU_PDBSS_EMAIL_TEMPLATES
C##PDBMGR            PACKAGE         PDBSS_FILTER_FW
C##PDBMGR            PACKAGE         PDBSS_FW
C##PDBMGR            TRIGGER         PDBSS_HISTORY_BIU
C##PDBMGR            TRIGGER         PDBSS_NOTIF_BIU
C##PDBMGR            TRIGGER         PDBSS_TZ_PREF_BIU
C##PDBMGR            PACKAGE BODY    PDBSS
C##PDBMGR            PACKAGE BODY    PDBSS_FILTER_FW
C##PDBMGR            PACKAGE BODY    PDBSS_FW
C##PDBMGR            PACKAGE BODY    PDBSS_EMAIL_API

28 rows selected.

I certainly can drop the user C##PDBMGR – but removing the Database Monitor user C##DBAAS_MONITOR may cause some trouble as the DBaaS Monitor won’t work anymore. And furthermore still three APEX objects remain INVALID.

I’ll update you as soon as I have my environment patched and refreshed sometime next week after UKOUG Conference.

–Mike

6 thoughts on “Switch on/off + Remove – Journey to the Oracle Cloud – II

  1. Pingback: Push a Button – Journey to the Oracle Cloud – I | Upgrade your Database - NOW!

  2. Pingback: TDE is wonderful – Journey to the Cloud V | Upgrade your Database - NOW!

  3. Pingback: APEX is in CDB$ROOT again – Journey to the Cloud VII | Upgrade your Database - NOW!

  4. Pingback: Patch, patch, patch – Journey to the Cloud – III | Upgrade your Database - NOW!

  5. Pingback: Clean up APEX – Journey to the Cloud IV | Upgrade your Database - NOW!

  6. Pingback: Patching does not work – Journey to the Cloud VI | Upgrade your Database - NOW!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *